• SCBWI Emerging Voices Grant — This award is given to two unpublished writers or illustrators from ethnic and/or cultural backgrounds that are traditionally under-represented in children’s literature in America and who have a ready-to-submit completed work for children.
    • Also available to non-U.S. citizens/residents
  • The Walter Grant (We Need Diverse Books) — Applicants must identify as diverse and must be unpublished as illustrators and/or authors working toward a career as a children’s author and/or illustrator. This includes but is not limited to: Picture Books, Early Reader Books, Chapter Books, Middle Grade Books, Young Adult, Graphic Novels, Non-Fiction, Poetry.
    • Not available to non-U.S. residents. Must be in the U.S.; available to refugees.
  • WNDB Emergency Fund for Diverse Creatives — Our emergency grants provide assistance to diverse authors, illustrators, and publishing professionals. Many diverse creatives have lost their livelihoods because of the pandemic, whether due to canceled school visits or due to layoffs and furloughs at publishers and literary agencies. We aim to bolster these groups during this time of crisis by giving grants between $500 and $1,000 each.
    • COVID specific; must be U.S. resident
  • The Black Creatives Fund — Will feature three initiatives in 2021, including a Revisions Workshop, a mentorship program, and a marketing symposia in partnership with the Brown Bookshelf. The Fund will launch with the six-month Revisions Workshop, in collaboration with PRH, that will support unpublished Black writers with completed manuscripts and will feature esteemed faculty, including Nicole Dennis-Benn, Nic Stone, and Karen Strong. Twelve writers selected for the workshop will have the opportunity to receive guidance throughout the revision process and submit their manuscript to editors at Penguin Random House for possible publication.
  • Vaunda Micheaux Nelson Scholarship from Hamline College — Annual award given to a new or current student in the program who shows exceptional promise as a writer of color. Editors at Lerner Publishing Group will select the winner of this annual award. The winner will agree to submit his/her final manuscript to Lerner for publishing consideration.
    • Not available to non-U.S. residents/must be in the U.S.
  • Octavia E. Butler Memorial Scholarship Fund — This fund enables writers of color to attend the Clarion writing workshops where writer Octavia Butler got her start.
    • Not available to non-U.S. residents/must be in the U.S.
  • SLF Diverse Writers and Diverse Worlds Grants — These grants are new works and works in progress. The Diverse Writers Grant focuses on writers from underrepresented and underprivileged backgrounds, and the Diverse Worlds Grant is for stories that best present a diverse world, regardless of the author’s background.
    • Also available to non-U.S. citizens/residents
  • The Highlights Foundation Diversity Fellowship in Children’s Literature — This 24-month professional mentorship program is designed for People of Color and Indigenous authors or illustrators who are actively pursuing publication within the children’s publishing industry and includes a robust professional development curriculum, one-on-one professional coaching, and more.
    • Also available to non-U.S. citizens and residents.
  • The Kweli Fellowship Program — Eligible candidates are early career vocational writers living in New York City, who are not enrolled in degree-granting programs and self-identify as POC, Native, and/or Arab American. Writers who have not yet contracted to publish a book are invited to apply.
    • Not available to non-U.S. residents; must live in New York
  • PEN/Heim Translation Fund Grants — Established in 2003 in response to the dismayingly low number of literary translations currently appearing in English, its purpose is to promote the publication and reception of translated international literature in English. 
  • PEN Emerging Voices Fellowship — Provides a five-month immersive mentorship program for early-career writers from communities that are traditionally underrepresented in the publishing world. The program is committed to cultivating the careers of Black writers, and serves writers who identify as Indigenous, persons of color, LGBTQIA+, immigrants, writers with disabilities, and those living outside of urban centers. Through curated one-on-one mentorship and introductions to editors, agents, and publishers, in addition to workshops on editing, marketing, and creating a platform, the five-month fellowship nurtures creative community, provides a professional skill-set, and demystifies the path to publication—with the ultimate goal of diversifying the publishing and media industries.
  • PEN America’s Writing for Justice Fellowship — Aims to harness the power of writers and writing in bearing witness to the societal consequences of mass incarceration by capturing and sharing the stories of incarcerated individuals, their families, communities, and the wider impact of the criminal justice system. Our goal is to ignite a broad, sustained conversation about the dangers of over-incarceration and the imperative to mobilize behind rational and humane policies.
  • Open City Fellowship (Asian American Writers’ Workshop) — The Open City Fellowship gives writers the opportunity to write narrative nonfiction on the vibrant immigrant communities of New York City. Fellows receive a $2,500 grant, skill-building workshops, and publishing opportunities as part of two nine-month fellowship opportunities: The Open City Neighborhoods Fellowship and the Open City Muslim Communities Fellowship.
    • Not available to non-U.S. residents
  • The Margins Fellowship (Asian American Writers’ Workshop) — The Margins Fellowship is an opportunity for four emerging creative writers to establish a home for their writing as they make progress on a book-length work. The Margins Fellowship grants a $5,000 fellowship, mentorship, work space, career guidance, and publishing opportunities to four Asian diasporic creative writers based in NYC for a full year. Fellows also receive special residency space at The Millay Colony for the Arts, a seven-acre artists retreat space at the former house and gardens of poet Edna St. Vincent Millay.
    • Not available to non-U.S. residents